UU Action NH adopts the 8th Principle of Unitarian Universalism to center our work against racism

This August, UU Action New Hampshire’s Leadership Team has formally adopted the 8th Principle, which affirms and promotes “journeying toward spiritual wholeness by working to build a diverse multicultural Beloved Community by our actions that accountably dismantle racism and other oppressions in ourselves and our institutions.”





We join the community of some 100 UU congregations and UU-related organizations that have adopted the 8th Principle. It’s one thing to pass a resolution. It’s another to embody those words so that they become a reality. As a UU justice organization, we are excited to face head on the challenges of living out the 8th Principle in our work in New Hampshire.

We did not make this decision lightly: our leaders rightly raised the question to if it was the right choice for us, a NH based organization, to make. Others praised our commitment to racial justice, but noted that this change is a lot: the Seven Principles have guided UUs for decades. But we decided that the language and values of the 8th Principle are important enough that we had to name and include them.

This summer, delegates at the UUA’s General Assembly overwhelmingly passed a “Responsive Resolution” that calls for including anti-racism and anti-oppression in the UU Principles. See the resolution here. A Responsive Resolution is a response to a report given during GA.

Beloved Community happens when people of diverse racial, ethnic, educational, class, gender, sexual orientation backgrounds/identities come together in an interdependent relationship of love, mutual respect, and care that seeks to realize justice within the community and in the broader world.

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